Posts Tagged 'zomby'

Review: Martyn – Remixes 1 & 2

Label: 3024
Catalog#: 3024-006

Tracklist:

A: Hear Me – Zomby Mix

B: Seventy Four – Redshape Mix

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Label: 3024
Catalog#: 3024-007

Tracklist:

A: Is This Insanity? ft. The Spaceape – Ben Klock Remix

B: Brilliant Orange – Illum Sphere’s No. 14 Mix

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Martyn has pushed his sound and 3024 for quite some time now. After getting recognition for his own and unique sound, he also got in contact with a lot of artists in both of the dubstep and techno genres. Zomby, Redshape, Ben Klock and Illum Sphere brings the original tracks into a new level with their wide takes and original ideas.

On the first record of two, Zomby creates a track that feels a little bit as his LP from last year on Ramp, combined with Martyn’s original atmosphere. The track doesn’t really “go” anywhere, but it has a nice groove combined with Zomby’s trademark melodies and beat structures. Redshape on the other hand, who delivers a remix of ‘Seventy Four’ that resembles a lot to Planet E and it’s artists. A mysterious Noir-like atmosphere fills the track with emotion, with a slow rumbling beat and percussion that undertakes a lot of different patterns throughout. The emphasis of the track is how it all develops. A clear signature sound from Redshape accompanied with a new side of his tracks first heard on ‘The Dance Paradox’ album from late ’09. A really suitable remix with remarkable appeal.

Ben Klock takes the voice of The Spaceape from the original – that is about the only thing left from it. Fusing his voice into drum elements combined with bleeping atmospheres and a killer beat, he pushes his own sound into a direction that does not only feel as (in a good way) obvious evolution, but also not losing to much ground with his introductionary ‘One’ album on Ostgut. A subtle progression is always there, kicking around the beat with a persistant contribution to everything else surrounding the track – haunting and mesmerizing, the vocal scatters across every other element, growing a feeling of a dusty old basement combined with the core of the energy in Klock’s sound.

For the other side, Illum Sphere’s ambient and droning space finishes up a remix series that feels very true to Martyn’s aesthetics. The ‘No. 14 Mix’ is very original, grasping a sense of a floating beat structure as well as being true to the beatless arrangement – very impressive and fresh.

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Review: Zomby – One Foot Ahead Of The Other EP

Label: Ramp Recordings
Catalog#: RAMP022

Tracklist:

A1: One Foot Ahead Of The Other

A2: Helter Skelter

B1: Pumpkinhead’s Revenge

B2: Polka Dot

C1: Godzilla

C2: Expert Tuition

D1: Bubble Bobble

D2: Mescaline Cola

D3: Firefly Finale

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Recommended!

From ‘Where Were U In ’92?’ to ‘Zomby EP’, Zomby shows his many sides of wonky and straight up Zombyism, as well as combining classical electronic genres and combining them in his own and unique way.

Being a parallell to ketamine and being a centerpoint in the discussion about wonky in general, he shows little interest about what people think – solely by remaining secretative about his identity as well as the absolute disregard to the pinpoints people put on him. One thing that Zomby always keeps up is the freedom he displays with his releases: the extremely unpredictable sound (well, to some extent; you can most surely rely on the sounds from old video games and resemblances) as well as his movements within most of electronic music.

‘One Foot Ahead Of The Other EP’ feels as the album that fits perfectly between his previous excursions. It’s never “too much”, which I could feel with ‘Zomby EP’ on Hyperdub – as well as with ‘Where Were U In ’92’ sometimes. This album feels more narrowed down, in the most positive regard – it feels more evolved and a bit more worked through, as if the idea of the music got a better practical result here.

One thing I really appreciate is that Zomby involves four by four rhythms and illusions, keeping the groove more steady brings in the pressure from four-to-the-floor beats. He manages to squeeze in his own sounds and samples(?) into the rhythms in a excellent way – as he surely always have been doing. It’s nice to feel the fast paced tempo of a 140 bpm techno track getting chopped, ket-ed up, and snorted into a very undefinable and fresh attempt on modern electronic music.

The highlights of the album are these tracks, as well as when Zomby puts things into a more futuristic sense, such as the title track and ‘Godzilla’. I could easily say that all tunes on the album are absolute killers.

You know what you get.