Review: Redshape – The Dance Paradox

Label: Delsin & Present
Catalog#: 80dsr/rds-lp1 80dsr/rds-lp1 ltd present black

Tracklist:

A1: Seduce Me
A2: Garage GT
B1: Bound – Part 1 & 2
B2: Man Out Of Time
C1: Globe
C2: Rorschach’s Game
D1: Dead Space Mix – Edit
D2: Dark & Sticky

10″

A: Man Out Of Time – Major Space Dub
B: Dead Space – Next Door Ultra Dub

Buy here

Recommended!

Honesty is engraved on the A and C sides of the vinyl release of this album. It is, without becoming to pretentious, the first thing that at least I come to think about when I listen to it.

When listening to the man behind Redshape’s previous material and putting it side by side with Redshape’s output over the years, the other releases seem to be a bit off focus. There’s this distorted, yet a calm before the storm sound that Redshape has pushed into his own for over three years now. That might not be a long time in retrospect, but it’s well time enough for a talented producer to create his own sonic world – this album might just be Redshape’s magnum opus, together with the exceptional ‘present white‘ release from 2006.

It all starts out so slow, you feel and hear every space that the sounds of ‘Seduce Me’ create, going from what seems almost to be ambient material into a state of “space dub”. A floating yet very direct intensity flows through, almost like machines making jazz with instruments such as steam, air and fire – the impression gets even stronger when you know that Redshape’s talent might very well be strained when making this track. It’s hard to describe everything that’s going on, but one thing is certain; putting this as a first track is an excellent introduction to a slower yet very intense side of the familiar sound of Redshape.

The intensity gets a faster pace with ‘Garage GT’. An extremely heavy kick, accompanied with original percussion and a atmospheric recording of a busy street might not at first sound that interesting, but as the track progresses, the idea with it all shines through and it all seems just so logical.

With a slow start comes the urge for something more powerful. ‘Bound – Part 1 & 2’ is the first proper techno track on the album. Even though it has moments where it feels a little weak, it makes you forget about what’s going on and let’s you go into it’s own state of flow. This is something that is appreciated when listening to a track of this sort, since it’s moving in a level between a track made for the dancefloor and a track “made for an album”. There’s this live feeling of the drum work which can seem a bit unecessary for a producer that in regular cases makes quite mechanical tracks – the inspiration for this move could be anything, but it’s nice to see Redshape wanting to create something new, and in some aspects unique.

One of the best tracks of the release is the ‘Major Space Dub’ of ‘Man Out Of Time’. The original has a certain groove that makes you want to move, but that dub version has a extremely special sense to it – Redshape really shines through with the whole ‘present black’ side-by-side release to the original album. Unfortunately, it’s limited to 295 copies and will probably be very hard to get hold of. Putting that into it all, the original seems a bit less of a substitute and more a track of it’s own – this is when it get’s the attention it needs, because the amount of detail in the original version is incredible.

The intensity is probably deliberately lost for the course over the next two tracks, which feels more like a breather and a display of feelings more than dance tracks. This is appreciated, even though a feeling that Redshape could at least put in one more track that has such a clear purpose and then move over to a more experimental state, they are still exceptional tracks.

The best track of the album is without any doubt the album edit of ‘The Playground – Dead Space Mix’. Being one of 2006 most important releases, this edit has a different and fresh arrangement to the elements, focusing more on giving it a proper groove and what follows with that. The power of techno as such could not have been showcased in any better way, combined with the insight Redshape seems to possess about his talent as a producer, including a track (even though it’s edited) that is well over 3 years old.

Concluding with ‘Dark & Sticky’, a track that feels well placed as and end. The same experimental side from the middle part of the album is the foundation here, but being placed last, there’s this certain beat that moves in dancefloor limbo – being connected to a more ambient structure but yet making the dance aspects content.

My favorite tracks:

Man Out Of Time

Man Out Of Time – Major Space Dub

Dead Space – Next Door Ultra Dub

Dead Space Mix – Edit

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3 Responses to “Review: Redshape – The Dance Paradox”


  1. 1 Ahoyskin October 24, 2009 at 15:06

    Can anyone explain exactly what the “present black” feature is on the limited LP? I just ordered it from Rush Hour and paid a big chunk of change for it to be shipped to the U.S. Apparently they still have some left for anybody interested in picking it up.

  2. 2 thefuturistmusic October 24, 2009 at 18:49

    These tracks are on the present black release:
    A: Man Out Of Time ā€“ Major Space Dub
    B: Dead Space ā€“ Next Door Ultra Dub

    Otherwise it’s just the regular album with all the other tracks.


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